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Example: Unit testing

This example shows you how you can make your safe Rust code safer by using the Rust unit test framework.

Example code

The code below shows how you can write a simple Rust application that serializes and deserializes a Rust structure, complete with unit tests. Refer to the testing guide for more information about running unit tests in an SGX enclave. Most of the time, unit tests run in enclave mode will have the same behaviour as the ones run without SGX. However, tunning unit tests in the enclave can help catch differences in the SGX platform.

The Point Structure

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extern crate serde;
use serde::{Serialize, Deserialize};

/// This example, uses a simple structure `Point` that is
/// serialized and deserialized to `JSON` using Rust's serde.
#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize, Debug, PartialEq)]
struct Point {
    pub x: i32,
    pub y: i32,
}

impl Point {
    fn as_json(&self)-> String
    {
        return serde_json::to_string(&self).unwrap()
    }

    fn from_json(s: &str)-> Self
    {
        return serde_json::from_str(s).unwrap()
    }
}

The main function

Here, the main function just prints a serialized and deserialized Point.

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fn main() {
    let point = Point { x: 1, y: 2 };

    // Convert the Point to a JSON string.
    let serialized = point.as_json();

    // Prints serialized = {"x":1,"y":2}
    println!("serialized = {}", serialized);

    // Convert the JSON string back to a Point.
    let deserialized = Point::from_json(&serialized);

    // Prints deserialized = Point { x: 1, y: 2 }
    println!("deserialized = {:?}", deserialized);
}

Unit tests

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#[cfg(test)]
mod tests {
    use super::*;
    /// This is a simple test case that demonstrates Rust unit tests.
    /// It verifies that the serialized point deserializes as expected. 
    #[test]
    fn test_point_serde() {
        let point = Point { x: 1, y: 2 };
        assert_eq!(point,  Point::from_json(&point.as_json()));
    }

    /// This demonstrates a way of writing a negative test case.
    #[test]
    #[should_panic(expected = "assertion failed: `(left == right)`")]
    fn test_specific_panic() {
        let p1 = Point { x: 1, y: 2 };
        let p2 = Point { x: 2, y: 2 };
        assert_eq!(p2,  Point::from_json(&p1.as_json()));
    }

}

The complete code is available on GitHub

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